14 Years Manufacturer Diminazene Aceturate Injection to Kazakhstan Factories

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  • Price & Quotation: FOB Shanghai: Discuss in Person
  • Shipment Port: Shanghai, Guangzhou, Chongqing, Yiwu
  • MOQ(5ml,10ml): 30000 Bottles
  • MOQ(50ml,100ml): 5000 Bottles
  • MOQ(250ml,500ml): 2000 Bottles
  • MOQ: Powder/Bolus: 500 KG
  • Payment Terms: T/T, L/C
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    14 Years Manufacturer Diminazene Aceturate Injection to Kazakhstan Factories Detail:

    COMPOSITION: 
    Each ml contains: 
    Diminazene Aceturate —-70 mg 
    Phenazone BP ————-37.5 mg 
    Water for Injection BP—-qs

    INDICATIONS: 
    DIMINAZENE injection is indicated for the treatment of Babesiosis, Trypanosomiasis, Theileriosis, 
    mixed haemoprotozoal infections and Pyrexia of Unknown Origin (PUO) in livestock. 

    DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION: 
    Babesiosis and Trypanosomiasis at the dose rate of 5-10 ml per 100 kg body weight. 
    Theileriosis at the dose rate of 5-10 ml per 100 kg body weight along with antibiotic (3-4 antibiotic injections in alternate days). 
    Mixed infections / Pyrexia of unknown origin at the dose rate of 5 ml per 100 kg body weight. 
    The total doses should not exceed 56 ml of DIMINAZENE injectable solution at a time per animal, 
    preferably by deep intramuscular route at multiple sites. 

    WITHDRAWAL TIME: 
    Meat: 21 days; Milk: 3 days 

    PRESENTATION: 
    50 ml and 100 ml


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 Diminazene Aceturate Injection to Kazakhstan Factories detail pictures


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    Filariasis (or philariasis) is a parasitic disease that is caused by thread-like roundworms belonging to the Filarioidea type.[1] These are spread from by blood-feeding black flies and mosquitoes.

    Eight known filarial nematodes use humans as their definitive hosts. These are divided into three groups according to the niche within the body they occupy:

    Lymphatic filariasis is caused by the worms Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia timori. These worms occupy the lymphatic system, including the lymph nodes; in chronic cases, these worms lead to the disease elephantiasis.
    Subcutaneous filariasis is caused by Loa loa (the eye worm), Mansonella streptocerca, and Onchocerca volvulus. These worms occupy the subcutaneous layer of the skin, in the fat layer. L. loa causes Loa loa filariasis, while O. volvulus causes river blindness.
    Serous cavity filariasis is caused by the worms Mansonella perstans and Mansonella ozzardi, which occupy the serous cavity of the abdomen.

    The adult worms, which usually stay in one tissue, release early larval forms known as microfilariae into the host’s bloodstream. These circulating microfilariae can be taken up with a blood meal by the arthropod vector; in the vector, they develop into infective larvae that can be transmitted to a new host.

    Individuals infected by filarial worms may be described as either “microfilaraemic” or “amicrofilaraemic”, depending on whether microfilariae can be found in their peripheral blood. Filariasis is diagnosed in microfilaraemic cases primarily through direct observation of microfilariae in the peripheral blood. Occult filariasis is diagnosed in amicrofilaraemic cases based on clinical observations and, in some cases, by finding a circulating antigen in the blood.

    Signs and symptoms

    The most spectacular symptom of lymphatic filariasis is elephantiasis—edema with thickening of the skin and underlying tissues—which was the first disease discovered to be transmitted by mosquito bites.[2] Elephantiasis results when the parasites lodge in the lymphatic system.

    Elephantiasis affects mainly the lower extremities, while the ears, mucous membranes, and amputation stumps are affected less frequently. However, different species of filarial worms tend to affect different parts of the body; Wuchereria bancrofti can affect the legs, arms, vulva, breasts, and scrotum (causing hydrocele formation), while Brugia timori rarely affects the genitals.[citation needed] Those who develop the chronic stages of elephantiasis are usually amicrofilaraemic, and often have adverse immunological reactions to the microfilariae, as well as the adult worms.[2]

    The subcutaneous worms present with skin rashes, urticarial papules, and arthritis, as well as hyper- and hypopigmentation macules. Onchocerca volvulus manifests itself in the eyes, causing “river blindness” (onchocerciasis), one of the leading causes of blindness in the world.[citation needed] Serous cavity filariasis presents with symptoms similar to subcutaneous filariasis, in addition to abdominal pain, because these worms are also deep-tissue dwellers.
    Diagnosis

    Filariasis is usually diagnosed by identifying microfilariae on Giemsa stained, thin and thick blood film smears, using the “gold standard” known as the finger prick test. The finger prick test draws blood from the capillaries of the finger tip; larger veins can be used for blood extraction, but strict windows of the time of day must be observed. Blood must be drawn at appropriate times, which reflect the feeding activities of the vector insects. Examples are W. bancrofti, whose vector is a mosquito; night is the preferred time for blood collection. Loa loa’s vector is the deer fly; daytime collection is preferred. This method of diagnosis is only relevant to microfilariae that use the blood as transport from the lungs to the skin. Some filarial worms, such as M. streptocerca and O. volvulus, produce microfilarae that do not use the blood; they reside in the skin only. For these worms, diagnosis relies upon skin snips, and can be carried out at any time.

    Treatment

    The recommended treatment for people outside the United States is albendazole (a broad-spectrum anthelmintic) combined with ivermectin.[3][4] A combination of diethylcarbamazine and albendazole is also effective.[3] All of these treatments are microfilaricides; they have no effect on the adult worms. Different trials were made to use the known drug at its maximum capacity in absence of new drugs. In a study from India, it has been shown that a formulation of albendazole has better anti-filarial efficacy than albendazole itself.[5]

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